University of Birmingham

Master in Social Research (Economic and Social History) - Máster en Investigación Social (Historia Económica y Social)

University of Birmingham
  • Imparte:
  • Modalidad:
    Presencial en Birmingham
  • Precio:
    We charge an annual tuition fee.
    Fees for 2016/17:
    Home / EU: £6,570 full-time
    Overseas: £14,850 full-time
  • Comienzo:
    Septiembre 2017
  • Lugar:
    Birmingham B15 2TT
    Reino Unido
  • Duración:
    1 Año
  • Idioma:
    El Curso se imparte en Inglés
  • Titulación:
    MA Social Research (Economic and Social History)


Are you looking to undertake research training that will prepare you for research in the field of economic and social history?

Our MA in Social Research is particularly useful if you want to convert to the study of economic and social history, or if you have already studied in this area and wish to improve your skills. It is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as providing the requisite research training for a PhD so you can apply for funding for the MA to be the first (training) year of a four-year PhD.


International students

Academic requirements
We accept a range of qualifications.

English language requirements

You can satisfy our English language requirements in two ways:

by holding an English language qualification to the right level
by taking and successfully completing one of our English courses for international students


You will study five core modules:

Introduction to Social Research

This module provides a general introduction to studying research and methods, and to preparing for a dissertation. It emphasises key skills such as searching literature, finding existing datasets, referencing, taking notes, reading and presenting a table of numbers, presenting an argument, and criticising an argument. It continues with consideration of generic issues for research, such as the main principles of ethics for applied empirical research, negotiating access to research sites, the role of theory, the philosophical bases for understanding the social world, and synthesising existing research through focus on the findings rather than the conclusions.

Research Design

This introduces you to the concepts and varieties of social science research designs. A key aim is to explain that design is independent of, and so does not entail, methods of data collection and analysis. Our intention is to link the introductory module to the modules on data collection and analysis through consideration of research questions and warranting practices.

Social Research Methods I

This module introduces you to the principles and practice of data collection, collation and analysis. Teaching and learning exercises demonstrate the value of research skills in relation to both textual and numeric data. The module develops understanding of different stages of the research process. The importance of ethical practice in research development, collection, collation, analysis and dissemination is stressed throughout.

Social Research Methods II

The module builds on Social Research Methods I.

Two large-scale studies (research materials, datasets) are employed to build research skills. Secondary research skills (using textual and numeric data) are explicitly explored as a base from which to conduct informed and appropriate data handling/analysis. An introduction to multivariate analysis will be provided, up to the level of multiple regression and analysis of variance. Techniques for analysing textual data will also be covered.

Historical Methods

This introduces you to the major intellectual debates in the development of the subject: e.g., history ‘from below’; the Annales school; Marxist approaches; gender; the new cultural history, etc. You will be introduced to some of the major schools of, or tendencies in, historical research; in turn the Annales School, the English historians response to Marxism, cultural history, the linguistic turn, gender, history of science and critical social theory (Geertz and Foucault). The focus is on the application of the ideas to historical practice then and now.

You will then choose one of the following optional modules:

Sites and Sources in Modern British Studies

This module introduces the rich and diverse sources through which historians and other scholars of modern Britain have tried to understand the past. Moving beyond a focus on social and political elites, we will explore the sources through which historians have explored the contours of everyday life. In so doing our aim is to think through the ways in which we might understand the pluralistic and inchoate messiness of ordinary life and historical change. A seaside postcard can be just as useful (and important) to a historian as a work of art. Using sources like these, however, presents different problems and possibilities. Sites and Sources in Modern British Studies will introduce you to these issues, and give you a broad grounding in the interpretation of diverse primary sources in studying the past.

Economics of War

As events in the last two centuries have shown, the outcome of conventional wars is very much dependent on the economic strength of the belligerents; and, in case of asymmetrical warfare, on whether the economical ‘superior power’ is willing to make the economic sacrifices necessary to winning a war. The module will introduce you to the economic problems of warfare since the Napoleonic era. Issues investigated will include: war finance; (industrial) production of war materials; organisation of wartime economies, including raw material provision, interruption of enemies’ economic systems; the ‘military-industrial complex’ and its influence; the impact political decisions have on the effectiveness and efficiency of armed forces; the impact of spiralling procurement costs.

Globalisation since 1945

The module examines various aspects of global history in the second half of the 20th century. It takes its cue from a growing literature which sees ´globalisation´ as a key feature of global history over the last half century. It will begin by examining the key institutions of a ´new world order´ built after the Second World War; in particular, those connected to the United Nations and Bretton Woods. It will then explore the key actors in the processes of globalisation: inter-governmental organisations; nation states (especially, the USA, the USSR and the non-aligned); multinational corporations and non-governmental organistations.

Salidas profesionales

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by the employability skills training offered through the College of Arts and Law Graduate School. The University also offers a wide range of activities and services to give our students the edge in the job market, including: career planning designed to meet the needs of postgraduates; opportunities to meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs, employer presentations and skills workshops; individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

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